2016 - Current IssueRSS

Articles

From Tweets to Seats: How Does Social Networking Site Use Affect Commuter University Studentsí Football Fandom?
Matthew J. Haught - University of Memphis
Erin Willis - University of Colorado-Boulder
Ashley Furrow - University of Memphis
David L. Morris III - University of Oregon
Karen Freberg - University of Louisville
Pages 17 - 38

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Urban universities serving a highly commuter-student population often struggle to draw student fans to athletic events. College athletic departments want to reach this group because they might become brand ambassadors for the university and can continue to contribute to the athletics program after graduation as a non-student fan. College athletic departments have embraced social networking sites (SNS) as a means for engagement. This study surveys students at two urban commuter universities to create student fan profiles so that institutions can determine which will be the most important football SNS for users. Findings indicate four fan types that engage with college football SNS for varying reasons, but that using SNS does not predict game attendance. This study offers suggestions for how athletic departments at public urban universities can help these students to develop a sense of pride and belonging to their institution. Implications for future research about SNS and behaviors, as well as for college football marketers are discussed.

Nutritional Regrets and Knowledge in National Collegiate Athletic Association
Division I Athletes: Establishing a Foundation for Educational Interventions

Leilani Madrigal - University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Patrick B. Wilson - Old Dominion University
Judith M. Burnfield - Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering
Pages 1 - 16

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The aim of this study was to describe the nutritional regrets and sport nutrition knowledge of Division I NCAA athletes and determine if higher knowledge would be related to fewer regrets. Additionally, we explored whether differences would emerge on nutrition knowledge or nutritional regrets based on gender or year in school. This was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted during the spring and summer of 2015. A total of 196 Division I NCAA student-athletes (145 male and 51 female) from a single university completed a questionnaire at the end of their competitive season. Comparisons on nutrition-related regrets and sport nutrition knowledge were conducted using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests. A Spearmanís rho correlation was used to examine the relationship between nutrition-related regrets and sports nutrition knowledge. Most student-athletes possessed regrets related to their eating habits, with few regretting weight management practices. Total nutritional regrets were higher in females than males, but did not differ significantly by school level. There was no significant association between nutritional knowledge and regrets. Interventions that incorporate education, strategies that increase dietary choice self-efficacy, and goal-setting may prove to be more efficacious in minimizing regrets in nutrition-related decision-making.

Book Reviews

Strong Inside: Perry Wallace and the Collision of Race and Sports in the South
By Andrew Maraniss. Published 2014 by Vanderbilt University Press, Nashville, Tennessee.
(467 pages).
- Reviewed by Adam Love, Ph.D. - Mississippi State University
- Pages i-iv